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Coronavirus - Africa: Update - The United States Continues to Lead the Global Response to COVID-19

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New foreign assistance funding commitments continue to bolster the unparalleled global leadership of the United States in response to COVID-19. The U.S. Government (USG) has allocated $20.5 billion to benefit the international response, including commitments for the development of vaccines and therapeutics, preparedness efforts, and foreign assistance. We continue to ensure that the substantial U.S. funding and scientific efforts on this front remain a central and coordinated part of the worldwide effort against this deadly virus. Importantly, our global efforts in the face of COVID-19 build upon decades of U.S. investment in life-saving health and humanitarian assistance. We are achieving real results, helping nations around the world respond to COVID-19 and thereby protecting the homeland.

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, the USG has announced more than $1.5 billion in State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) emergency health, humanitarian, economic, and development assistance specifically aimed at helping governments, international organizations, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) fight the pandemic. This funding, provided by U.S. taxpayers, will save lives by improving public health education; protecting healthcare facilities; and increasing laboratory, disease-surveillance, and rapid-response capacity in more than 120 countries.

The United States has mobilized as a nation to make this an impressive global effort. Working with the private sector, we are actively fulfilling President Trump’s commitment to provide ventilators to our partners and allies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Our foreign assistance funding to date for the response to the COVID-19 pandemic now includes more than $250 million specifically for ventilators.

The COVID-19 assistance to-date from the State Department and USAID includes the following:

  • More than $490 million in emergency health assistance from USAID’s Global Health Emergency Reserve Fund for Contagious Infectious-Disease Outbreaks and Global Health Programs account. These funds prioritize interventions to mitigate the pandemic and prepare communities in developing countries affected by and at-risk of COVID-19. This includes funding for ventilators – highly specialized, state-of the art medical equipment used in hospitals and other medical facilities to help support patients who are having trouble breathing. These life-saving devices are compact and will give recipient countries flexibility in treating patients most seriously affected by advanced COVID-19 symptoms easily and quickly throughout the country. As an added benefit, the ventilators can also be used to treat patients for other respiratory ailments beyond the virus for years to come.
  • A total of more than $875 million in humanitarian assistance overall, through International Disaster Assistance and Migration and Refugee Assistance, including:
    • $558 million in humanitarian assistance from USAID’s International Disaster Assistance (IDA) account. This assistance, provided through USAID’s Bureau of Humanitarian Assistance, supports case-management and keeps essential health care operating; provides risk-communication and community-engagement programs; supports efforts to prevent and control infections; provides safe water and hygiene items; provides emergency food assistance; and strengthens local capacity and coordination by working with existing health structures and with others in the humanitarian community. These funds prioritize populations affected by ongoing humanitarian crises, particularly internally-displaced people (IDPs) and other displaced persons, because of their heightened vulnerability, the elevated risk of severe outbreaks in camps and informal settlements, and anticipated disproportionate mortality in these populations.
    • More than $317 million in humanitarian assistance from the Migration and Refugee Assistance (MRA) account, provided through the State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration. These funds help international organizations and NGO partners address the increased vulnerability created by the pandemic of refugees and host communities as well as among migrants and other vulnerable and conflict-affected people. This includes strengthening local health responses and provision of emergency relief items to vulnerable families.
  • More than $208 million from the Economic Support Fund (ESF). These funds promote American foreign-policy interests by financing shorter-term mitigation efforts and addressing the second-order impacts of the pandemic in the long term, across a variety of sectors. ESF funding is also being used to provide ventilators.

This new COVID-19 foreign assistance is provided in addition to the more than $100 billion in global health funding and nearly $70 billion in overseas humanitarian assistance provided by the United States in the last decade alone.

These new amounts do not include assistance being provided by other USG Departments and Agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Defense (DoD).

In addition to this direct funding from the U.S. Government, our All-of-America approach is helping people around the world to confront the ongoing pandemic. Through the generosity of American private businesses, non-profit groups, charitable organizations, faith-based organizations, and individuals, Americans have now provided more than $4.9 billion in donations and assistance globally for COVID-19 response, more than any other nation.

To meet the most urgent needs, U.S. Government Departments and Agencies are coordinating efforts to prioritize foreign assistance to maximize the potential for impact. The United States is providing the following assistance through the State Department and USAID:

Africa:

  • Angola: $570,000 for health assistance is helping provide risk-communications and water and sanitation, as well as to prevent and control infections in key health facilities in Angola. This assistance comes on top of long-term U.S. investments in Angola, which total $1.48 billion over the past 20 years, including over $613 million for health assistance.
  • Benin: $1.5 million in health assistance will help Beninois respond to the outbreak by funding the coordination and planning of outbreak-response activities, strengthening surveillance and rapid-response capabilities, and risk-communications and engagement with communities. This assistance joins $1.72 billion in total assistance for Benin over the past 20 years, over $364 million of which was for health.
  • Botswana: $1.5 million in health assistance to address the outbreak. Funding will support risk-communications and community engagement, with a focus on the most vulnerable populations, the procurement of essential health commodities and logistic support, and strengthening case-management and the prevention and control of infections in key health facilities. This assistance builds on nearly $1.2 billion in total assistance in Botswana over the last 20 years, over $1.1 billion of which has been for health.
  • Burkina Faso: Nearly $15.3 million in health and humanitarian funding will go toward risk-communications, water and sanitation, preventing and controlling infections in health facilities, public-health messaging, and emergency food assistance. This includes $2.5 million in health assistance, $9 million in IDA humanitarian assistance, and nearly $3.8 million in MRA humanitarian assistance, which will help protect the health of vulnerable people in Burkina Faso during the pandemic. Over the past 20 years, the United States has invested a total of more than $1.4 billion in Burkina Faso, including over $222 million for health.
  • Burundi: More than $5.8 million in total funding for the response to COVID-19 includes $2 million in health assistance; $1.5 million in IDA humanitarian assistance to support water, sanitation, hygiene, and protection activities; and more than $2.3 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to help protect the health of vulnerable people. The health assistance will improve the planning and coordination of response activities, the strengthening of surveillance and rapid-response capabilities, strengthening capacities for case-management and the prevention and control of infections, and the training of health workers. The United States has invested more than $997 million in total assistance for Burundi, including more than $254 million for health, over the past 20 years.
  • Cameroon: $17.9 million for health and humanitarian assistance will help provide infection-control in key health facilities, strengthen laboratories and surveillance, prepare communities, bolster local messaging, and provide emergency food assistance. This includes $14.1 million for health and IDA humanitarian assistance from USAID and more than $3.8 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to support refugees, IDPs, and host communities. This assistance builds upon more than $962 million in total U.S. Government investment in the country over the past 20 years, over $390 million of which was for health.
  • Central African Republic: More than $13.1 million in humanitarian assistance, including $9 million in IDA humanitarian assistance that will go toward risk-communications, preventing and controlling infections in health facilities, emergency food assistance, and safe water supplies, and more than $4.1 million in MRA humanitarian assistance that will help protect the health of vulnerable people in the Central African Republic during the pandemic. The U.S. Government has provided $822.6 million in total in the Central African Republic over the last 20 years, including $4.5 million in emergency health assistance in Fiscal Year (FY) 2019.
  • Chad: $9.7 million in humanitarian assistance, including $7 million from the IDA account for preventing and controlling infections in health facilities, raising community awareness of COVID-19, emergency food assistance, and improving hygiene, and nearly $2.7 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to help protect the health of vulnerable people in Chad during the pandemic. This assistance builds upon the foundation of nearly $2 billion in total U.S. assistance over the last 20 years, including more than $30 million for health.
  • Republic of Congo (ROC): $850,000 in assistance, including $250,000 in health assistance that will address the outbreak, by supporting the coordination and planning of response activities, risk-communications and community-outreach activities and the training of health workers in protocols for preventing and controlling infections in health facilities. $600,000 in MRA humanitarian assistance will support refugees, internally displaced persons, and host communities. The United States has invested in the Republic of Congo for decades, including more than $171.2 million in total U.S. assistance over the last 20 years, over $36.9 million of which has been for health.
  • Cote d’Ivoire: $3.2 million in health assistance to address the outbreak by financing risk-communications and community engagement; the training of health care providers in protocols for preventing and controlling infections in health facilities and the appropriate management of cases of COVID-19 and influenza-like illnesses; and ensuring these facilities are appropriately supplied with essential health commodities. Funding will also finance the training of health workers in critical community-level surveillance techniques, such as case-finding and contact-tracing. Over the past 20 years, the United States has invested more than $2.1 billion in long-term development and other assistance in Cote d’Ivoire.
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC): Approximately $33.9 million in total including $14 million for IDA humanitarian assistance that will improve the prevention and control of infections in health facilities, provide emergency food assistance, and support improved awareness of COVID-19, including by working with religious leaders and journalists on risk-communication messaging. Nearly $8.9 million in MRA humanitarian assistance will help protect vulnerable people in the DRC during the pandemic. An additional $6 million in global health assistance funding will support supply-chain management and logistics, as well as the procurement of essential health commodities; strengthening critical disease-surveillance activities, including community-based surveillance, contact-tracing, and case-finding; strengthening practices to prevent and control infections at health facilities and train health workers, as well as community-based efforts to improve access to water and basic hygiene materials, with the direct distribution of kits to households to prevent infections. Health assistance also will support mobilizing thousands of volunteers in targeted, high-risk Provinces to conduct risk-communications and community-engagement activities. Finally, approximately $5 million in ESF will go toward distance and alternative education for Congolese children and youth so they can continue to learn and maintain protective routines and social connections while schools remain closed across the country. This builds upon more than $6.3 billion in total U.S. assistance over the past 20 years, including more than $1.5 billion for health.
  • Djibouti: $750,000 in total, including $500,000 in health assistance to address the outbreak and $250,000 in MRA humanitarian assistance to assist vulnerable migrants and host communities as they deal with the pandemic. Health assistance will support strengthening the capacity for testing, supply-planning, supply-chain management and the distribution of urgent health commodities needed for COVID-19. The health assistance also will fund risk-communications and community-outreach activities, the training of health workers to implement protocols to prevent and control infections in health facilities and manage cases of COVID-19; and disease-surveillance and rapid-response protocols and functionality. The United States has already invested more than $338 million in Djibouti over the last 20 years.
  • Eswatini: $1.1 million in health assistance to address the outbreak by bolstering Eswatini’s emergency health response, which could include the procurement of supplies, contact-tracing, laboratory diagnostics, and raising public awareness. This assistance builds upon the foundation of U.S. Government investments in the Kingdom, which total more than $529 million assistance over the last 20 years, including more than $490 million for health.
  • Ethiopia: $51.3 million in assistance to counter COVID-19, including $27.4 million in IDA humanitarian assistance for risk-communications, the prevention and control of infections in health facilities, disease-surveillance, contact-tracing, coordination, and emergency food assistance; more than $13.5 million in MRA humanitarian assistance for vulnerable people, including refugees, migrants, and host communities; and more. This assistance is in addition to the United States’ long-term investments in Ethiopia over the past 20 years of more than $13 billion, nearly $4 billion of which was for health.
  • Ghana: $1.6 million in health assistance to address the outbreak by strengthening outbreak-response capabilities, including community-based surveillance for case-finding and contact-tracing; improve laboratory diagnostic capacity; optimize the management of COVID-19 cases and the prevention and control of infections in health facilities; and promote risk-communications and community-engagement activities. This assistance builds upon $3.8 billion in total U.S. Government investments in Ghana over the last 20 years, including nearly $914 million for health.
  • Guinea: $1.3 million in health assistance to address the outbreak by financing risk-communications and community-outreach activities, the training of health workers to implement protocols to prevent and control infections in health facilities; and disease-surveillance and rapid-response protocols and functionality. The United States has invested nearly $1 billion in total assistance in Guinea over the last 20 years, including over $365.5 million for health.
  • Kenya: Nearly $16.3 million for health and humanitarian assistance, including $13.5 million in health and IDA humanitarian assistance to provide emergency food assistance; bolster risk-communications; prepare health-communication networks and media for possible cases; and help provide public-health messaging for media, health workers, and communities; and more than $2.7 million in MRA humanitarian assistance for refugees and host communities. This assistance specific to COVID-19 comes on top of long-term U.S. Government investments in Kenya, which total $11.7 billion over the last 20 years, including more than $6.7 billion for health.
  • Lesotho: $750,000 in health assistance to address the outbreak by strengthening outbreak-response capabilities, including community-based surveillance for case-finding and contact tracing, strengthening laboratory diagnostic capacity, and optimizing case-management and the prevention and control of infections in health facilities. The health assistance also will finance risk-communications and community-engagement activities. This assistance builds upon decades of U.S. investments in Lesotho, which total more than $1 billion over the last 20 years, including more than $834 million for health.
  • Liberia: $2.3 million in health and IDA humanitarian assistance will provide critical aid for all 15 Liberian Counties (emergency-operation centers, training, contact-tracing, hospitals, and community health care), support quarantine efforts, and provide village-level support. The United States has helped lay a strong foundation for Liberia’s response to COVID-19 through more than $4 billion in total assistance over the past 20 years, including more than $675 million for health.
  • Madagascar: $7.5 million in total assistance, including $2.5 million in health assistance and $5 million in IDA humanitarian aid to provide emergency food assistance. The health assistance is addressing the outbreak by strengthening laboratory capacity for diagnostics; deploying mobile laboratories for decentralized diagnosis; improving regional and district surveillance, including data systems and the training of community health volunteers in contact-tracing; promoting risk-communications and community-engagement activities, including a staffed hotline, mass-media campaigns and prevention messages; the training of health professionals infection and prevention control training, procurement of essential health commodities, and improvements in waste management. The United States has invested more than $1.5 billion in total assistance for Madagascar over the last 20 years, including nearly $722 million for health.
  • Malawi: $4.5 million in health assistance to address the outbreak. Funding will support the COVID-19 response and preparedness activities at the district level, including surveillance activities, strengthening infection and prevention control practices, screening at points of entry, and case management. Funding will also support risk communication and community engagement, including radio and social media campaigns; and technical assistance to optimize supply chain logistics and management. The United States has provided more than $3.6 billion in total assistance for Malawi over the past 20 years, including more than $1.7 billion for health.
  • Mali: More than $13.8 million in assistance for the response to COVID-19, which includes $2.4 million for health assistance and $6.7 million in IDA humanitarian assistance for risk-communications, the prevention and control of infections in health facilities, emergency food assistance, and coordination; and more than $4.7 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to support vulnerable people in Mali during the pandemic. Health assistance will support risk-communications and community engagement, including by establishing community communication networks with modern and traditional methods and to call on citizens to counter misinformation and rumors, as well as support to the Ministry of Health’s National Hotline; strengthening diagnostic networks and disease-surveillance systems, optimizing real-time surveillance to accelerate the detection and investigation of cases and contact-tracing and train and mobilize existing community-surveillance, early-warning and emergency rapid-response teams to report infections and assist ill persons in getting prompt and appropriate care. The health funding also will finance activities to prevent and control infections at priority case-detection points (including points of entry to Mali along high-traffic cargo routes) and public and community health facilities, including through the procurement of equipment and supplies to prevent infections and manage medical waste. This assistance builds upon decades of U.S. Government investments in Mali, which total more than $3.2 billion over the last 20 years, including more than $807 million for health.
  • Mauritania: $850,000 in assistance, including $250,000 in health assistance to address the outbreak by financing risk-communications and community-engagement activities, strengthening supply-chain management and logistics, and improving the prevention and control of infections in health facilities; and $600,000 in MRA humanitarian assistance for refugees and host communities. The United States has provided more than $424 million in total assistance over the last 20 years for Mauritania, including more than $27 million for health, which builds a strong foundation for their pandemic response.
  • Mauritius: $500,000 in health assistance to address the outbreak under the national response strategy for COVID-19, including by strengthening coordination and logistics; developing and disseminating risk-communications and prevention materials at the community level; strengthening protocols for the prevention and control of infections in health facilities; disseminating case-management guidelines and training health workers in their use; improving surveillance and rapid-response protocols and functionality; and expanding laboratory capacity. This assistance builds upon the foundation of more than $13 million in total U.S. Government investments over the past 20 years, including more than $838,000 for health.
  • Mozambique: $14.8 million, including $4.8 million for health assistance and $10 million in IDA humanitarian funding will finance risk-communications and community engagement, including mass-media prevention messages; water and sanitation; emergency food assistance; and the prevention and control of infections in key health facilities in Mozambique. The health assistance also will fund the training of health workers in case-management and ensuring health facilities are prepared to respond to the outbreak. The United States has invested nearly $6 billion in Mozambique over the past 20 years, including more than $3.8 billion for health.
  • Namibia: $750,000 in health assistance to address the outbreak by improving laboratory capacity for diagnostics and technical assistance in supply-chain management and logistics. This assistance comes in addition to nearly $1.5 billion in total U.S. Government investments to Namibia over the past 20 years, including more than $970.5 million in long-term health assistance.
  • Niger: Nearly $12.1 million in assistance includes $750,000 for health assistance and $8 million in IDA humanitarian assistance for risk-communications, the prevention and control of infectious diseases in health facilities, emergency food assistance, and coordination; and more than $3.3 million in MRA humanitarian assistance will support vulnerable people in Niger during the pandemic, including refugees, vulnerable migrants, and host communities. This assistance comes on top of more than $2 billion in total U.S. Government investments for Niger in the past 20 years, nearly $233 million for health.
  • Nigeria: More than $41.3 million in assistance, which includes more than $3.3 million for health assistance and $34 million in IDA humanitarian funding for risk-communications, water and sanitation, infection-prevention, coordination, and emergency food assistance; and nearly $4.1 million in MRA humanitarian assistance for vulnerable people. This assistance joins more than $8.1 billion in total assistance for Nigeria over the past 20 years, including more than $5.2 billion for health.
  • Rwanda: Nearly $3.2 million in assistance for Rwanda’s response to COVID-19 includes $1.7 million for health assistance that will help with disease-surveillance and case-management, and nearly $1.5 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to support refugees and host communities in Rwanda. This comes on top of long-term U.S. Government investments in Rwanda that total more than $2.6 billion in total assistance over the past 20 years, including more than $1.5 billion for health.
  • Senegal: $4.6 million in assistance, including $3.9 million in health assistance to support risk-communications, water and sanitation, the prevention and control of infections in health facilities, public health messaging, and more; and $700,000 in MRA humanitarian assistance for refugee, returnees, and host communities. In Sénégal, the U.S. has invested nearly $2.8 billion in total over the past 20 years, nearly $880 million for health.
  • Sierra Leone: $6.2 million in health and IDA humanitarian assistance to address the outbreak by strengthening surveillance activities, case-finding, contact-tracing, risk-communications, community engagement, emergency food assistance, and the management of cases of COVID-19 at health facilities. This assistance joins decades of U.S. investments in Sierra Leone, totaling more than $954 million in total assistance over the past 20 years, including nearly $260 million for health.
  • Somalia: More than $23 million in humanitarian assistance for the response to COVID-19 will fund risk-communications, the prevention and control of infectious diseases in health facilities, case-management, and more, including for internally displaced persons, refugees, returnees, and vulnerable migrants. This assistance comes in addition to $5.3 billion in total assistance for Somalia over the last 20 years, including nearly $30 million for health.
  • South Africa: Approximately $9.1 million in health assistance to counter COVID-19 will fund risk-communications, water and sanitation, the prevention and control of infections in health facilities, public health messaging, and more. The United States has also pledged to send up to 1,000 ventilators to South Africa, the first 50 of which arrived on May 11, 2020. This assistance joins more than $7 billion in total assistance by the United States for South Africa in the past 20 years, nearly $6 billion invested for health.
  • South Sudan: Nearly $46.9 million in assistance includes $35.2 million in IDA humanitarian assistance for case management, prevention and control of infections, logistics, coordination efforts, risk communications, water, sanitation and hygiene, and emergency food assistance; $2.8 million in health programming; and more than $8.9 million in MRA humanitarian assistance that will support refugees and host communities in South Sudan during the pandemic. The health assistance will fund expanded training of health workers and peer educators on proper practices to prevent and control infections in health facilities to protect communities and patients, particularly those at high risk or who are immunocompromised, and strengthening the capabilities of health facilities and communities to manage and refer cases of COVID-19. The health assistance also will fund expanding efforts to address community concerns, including by tracking and combating rumors, misconceptions, and grievances. This funding builds upon past U.S. investments in South Sudan that total $6.4 billion over the past 20 years, including more than $405 million for health.
  • Sudan: More than $38.8 million in assistance includes $1 million in health assistance and $28.8 million in IDA humanitarian assistance for strengthening laboratory capacity, disease surveillance and contact-tracing, case-management, risk-communications, disease-surveillance, the prevention and control of infections, water, sanitation and hygiene, and emergency food assistance; $5 million in ESF for cash assistance to vulnerable families adversely affected by COVID-19; and more than $4 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to support vulnerable people. The United States has invested more than $1.6 billion in total assistance for Sudan over the last 20 years, more than $3 million of which was for health.
  • Tanzania: $4.6 million in assistance includes $3.4 million in health assistance funds to strengthen laboratory capacity for optimal diagnostics, risk-communications, water and sanitation, the prevention and control of infections, public health messaging, and more. It also includes $1.2 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to support vulnerable refugees, migrants, and host communities with a focus on children, youth, and their care providers. The United States has invested more than $7.5 billion total in Tanzania over the past 20 years, nearly $4.9 billion for health.
  • Uganda: $15.1 million in assistance includes $2.3 million in health assistance to address the outbreak; $4 million in IDA humanitarian assistance to provide emergency food assistance to refugees; and nearly $8.8 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to support refugees and host communities, including youth, and their care providers, in Uganda during the pandemic. The health assistance will strengthen the prevention and control of infections and case-management practices in health facilities, including by training health workers in new protocols; promote risk-communications and community engagement, including materials and messages to address most vulnerable groups; and improve management systems to ensure the accountability and availability of, and access to, health commodities, essential medicines, and health supplies in health facilities to maintain the continuity of services. This assistance is provided in addition to the nearly $8 billion in total U.S. Government investments for Uganda over the last 20 years, including nearly $4.8 billion for health.
  • Zambia: $4.6 million in assistance, including $3.4 million in health assistance that will fund risk-communications, water and sanitation, the prevention and control of infections, public health messaging, and more; and $1.2 million in MRA humanitarian assistance for refugees and host communities. This assistance joins $4.9 billion total U.S. Government investments for Zambia over the past 20 years, nearly $3.9 billion in U.S. health assistance.
  • Zimbabwe: Nearly $16.3 million, including nearly $3 million for health assistance; $12 million for IDA humanitarian assistance that will help to prepare laboratories for large-scale testing, support case-finding activities for influenza-like illnesses, implement a public-health emergency plan for points of entry, and emergency food assistance; and more than $1.3 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to support vulnerable migrants during the pandemic. The health assistance will fund the strengthening of laboratory capacity, the prevention and control of infections and the management of cases of COVID-19 in health facilities, including hand-washing stations, screening centers, preparing hospitals to be ready to treat COVID-19 patients, training health workers, and setting up alternative care-delivery points. Funding also will also support the training of rapid-response teams, community health workers and volunteers; and risk-communications and community engagement. This assistance builds on a history of U.S. investments in Zimbabwe – nearly $3 billion total over the past 20 years, nearly $1.2 billion of which was for health.
  • Regional Efforts in the Sahel: $5 million in ESF will strengthen the efforts of partner governments and civil society to manage and respond to COVID-19 with transparent communication and response. These investments will cover Burkina Faso, Niger, The Gambia, Chad, and Mali.
  • Regional Efforts in West Africa: $6.6 million including $5 million in ESF to conduct information campaigns with local authorities and communities and engage community groups, community radio stations, and local media actors to develop targeted messaging in local languages. This assistance will also engage citizens in local-led advocacy, dialogue, and inclusive behavior change. These investments will cover Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Togo, Bénin, and Guinea. $1.1 million in health assistance is supporting efforts to reduce human-to-human transmissions of COVID-19 and mitigate the impact of the epidemic through risk communication and community engagement activities, improving infection prevention and control at the community and health facility levels, provision of critical health supplies, improved WASH services, and strengthening community surveillance, data collection and analysis.
  • Regional Sub-Saharan Africa Humanitarian Assistance: More than $6 million in MRA humanitarian assistance to help vulnerable people during the pandemic.
Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Africa Regional Media Hub.
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